What is motion sickness?

Motion sickness (or sometimes referred to as sea sickness or car sickness), is a common experience and complaint. It can occur when travelling on a bus/ car/ train/ plane or boat, but also when watching sports, scrolling on your phone and now, even in response to virtual reality. Common symptoms include nausea, vomiting, headache, sweating and drowsiness, amongst others. 

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At TPC, we recognise that a stroke can have profound and lasting effects. The journey towards rebuilding motor skills and daily functions is ongoing and can be challenging. Physiotherapy is a vital part of stroke rehabilitation, empowering patients to achieve greater independence, enhance their quality of life, and improve physical abilities. Our dedicated rehab team is committed to supporting stroke survivors every step of the way.

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When learning about the pelvic floor, it’s common to come across information detailing the importance of preparing the pelvic floor for childbirth in women, and helping with recovery postpartum. The reality, however, is that our pelvic floor plays an incredibly important role for both men and women throughout our lives, forming part of our deep core muscles, and with pelvic floor problems affecting everything from continence to sexual health to back pain.

As such, our women’s, men’s and pelvic health physios can help with a range of problems – some that may surprise you. Here’s a look into why your pelvic floor is important, the kinds of problems our patients face when their pelvic floor isn’t functioning effectively, the relationship between the pelvic floor and the common problem of incontinence, and how our pelvic health physiotherapists work with both men and women to help.

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A woman’s life is typically marked by several unique life stages such as, menarche, pregnancy, childbirth and menopause. These stages are exclusive to women, and as such can provide specific challenges to a woman’s quality of life. One area of the body commonly impacted by these life stages, and the changes that come with them, is the pelvic floor. A group of small, but very important muscles, found at the base of the pelvis, the pelvic floor has a huge role to play throughout a woman’s life and is often overlooked. Pelvic floor dysfunction has been found to impact at least 25% of women at some stage of their life before they turn 80, and even doubles after this.

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What is vertigo? 

Vertigo is a term commonly used to describe various sensations of dizziness. The technical definition of vertigo refers specifically to the perception of motion when there is no actual movement. Vertigo occurs due to a disturbance in what’s known as the vestibular system. The vestibular system is responsible for telling our brain when our head is moving and it allows us to keep our vision steady during movements. For example, when we are walking, the vestibular system is what allows us to turn our head to the left while keeping our eyes forward so we don’t fall over.

The vestibular system is a sensory apparatus that lies within the inner ear, which is why you may have heard people say that your ears are responsible for your balance! The inner ear is located within the bony labyrinth of the temporal bone and contains the cochlea, semicircular canals & the otolith organ.

Figure from https://www.brainkart.com/article/Vestibular-Apparatus—Control-of-Posture-and-Movement_21021/

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Whether you’re trying to stay physically active or just making your way around your workplace, for the 25% of adults that develop knee pain, movement and daily life can quickly become difficult and uncomfortable. So when it comes to getting help for your knee pain, a physiotherapist and an exercise physiologist can both help.

With both physiotherapists and exercise physiologists on our team, and both professions playing valuable roles in optimising the recovery following a knee injury, here’s a look into what each respective profession does and how they can help you.

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Type 2 diabetes is a condition that is rapidly increasing in prevalence with an average of 165 new diagnoses every day in Australia. However, the good news is that lifestyle interventions, such as regular physical activity, can play a significant role in both preventing and managing this condition. In this blog, we will delve into the importance of exercise and how the expertise of exercise physiologists and physiotherapists can be instrumental in the prevention, management, and treatment of type 2 diabetes.

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Living with Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS) can be challenging, but incorporating regular exercise into your routine can make a significant difference in managing symptoms and improving your overall quality of life. However, exercising with POTS requires careful consideration and customisation to avoid exacerbating symptoms. This blog aims to provide the benefits of exercise for those with POTS and practical recommendations. It is encouraged that you work closely with a healthcare provider for an individualised plan based on your needs and capabilities. 

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‘Dizziness’ is a common term used to describe a large group of symptoms and sometimes it can be difficult to put these symptoms precisely into words. There are a wide range of terms used to describe dizziness and some of these include:

  • Vertigo
  • Spinning
  • Nausea
  • Imbalance
  • Unsteadiness
  • Light-headedness
  • Floating or falling sensations
  • Difficulty focussing vision
  • Feeling ‘drunk’
  • Feelings of a ‘surreal environment’ or ‘detachment’ from self
  • Brain fog and difficulties concentrating
  • Feeling unsteady or anxious in busy environments.
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When it comes to concussion recovery, many may not be aware that physiotherapists play an important role in guiding individuals back to optimal health. It’s a lesser-known fact that you can seek the expertise of a physiotherapist for concussion management. Let’s delve into the reasons, methods, and benefits of consulting a physiotherapist when dealing with the aftermath of a concussion. 

The Unseen Side of Concussion Management: While conventional wisdom may associate physiotherapists primarily with musculoskeletal issues, their expertise extends to the intricate world of neurological rehabilitation, making them well-equipped to handle concussions. 

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